Black Eagle Arrow Spine Charts

Compound chart 2015 12 12 | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store

traditional chart 2015 12 12 | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store
* The UL 30-50 shafts are also available for use in this spine selection, depending on your setup.

These are based on a 100 gr. point, if you use a 125 gr. point you may need to use a stiffer spine
if you use a 85 gr. point you may need to use the weaker spine.

 

Easton Arrow Spine Charts

FMJ and Carbon Arrow Size Selection | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store

Easton Aluminum Arrow Size Selection | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store

Easton Shaft Models | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store

 

Gold Tip Arrow Spine Charts

Gold Tip Compound Arrow Spine Chart | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear StoreGold Tip Compound Arrow Spine Chart 315 | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear StoreGold Tip Recurve Bow Arrow Spine Chart | Extreme Outfitters | Outdoor & Camping Gear Store

For help finding the right shaft please email [email protected] or give us a call 910-355-2118

ARROW SELECTION GUIDE TIPS
These are general Guidelines. Please contact us.

In order to properly select the right arrows for your specific bow, you need to identify several variables, and make your selection accordingly. We will briefly discuss these variables, and how they affect your arrow needs.

The first variable you need to look at is draw weight. As draw weight increases, so should arrow rigidity (spine). Also, we strongly recommend that you use an arrow with at least 5 grains of weight per pound or draw weight (if you are shooting a 60 lb. bow, you should use and arrow of not less than 300 grains). This includes your field point or broadhead.

The next factor we will discuss is arrow length. For practical purposes, we use arrow length above draw length. Since the recent trends have been toward drop-away style arrow rests which are mounted to the rear of the riser, arrow length and draw length are no longer evenly proportional. Given a specific arrow spine, an arrow that is shorter will be more rigid than a shaft of the same spine that is longer. For example, if you have a 60 lb. bow with a 24″ arrow, you would need a more flexible shaft than a 60 lb. bow with a 30″ arrow.

If you have any questions about selecting the proper arrow for your bow that isn’t covered here, we will be glad to assist you.